Mucuna Pruriens, Magical Male Aphrodisiac and More

0
5
Email Print Share

Not many people know all the many healing properties of mucuna pruriens: infertility, Parkinson’s, anti-snake venom. Here is your chance to learn more!

mucuna_legume_picMucuna pruriens is one variety of the mucuna species and the plant that we will be covering here. It is a tropical vine that produces a legume that has been widely cultivated. This plant is known by many slang names including velvet bean. It is the processed legume of this plant that holds the magic.

For men who are infertile, this tropical legume has been proven to bring great healing. Studies revealed that consumption of mucuna increased both sperm count and motility of the sperm.[1][2][3]

Both human and animal studies conclude that mucuna consumption imparts aphrodisiac properties to males. [4][5]

In both Africa and India, mucuna has been used as an anti-snake venom agent. Now modern science has found the mechanism for its anti-venom properties.[6][7][8][9]

A double blind clinical study was done on people with Parkinson’s disease to determine the effect of taking mucuna. They concluded that mucuna seed powder is a natural source of L-dopa and may possess advantages over conventional L-dopa preparations in the long-term management of Parkinson’s disease.[10]

In fact, there is evidence to prove that as early as the year 300 BC, Parkinson’s disease was identified and treated with mucuna in India. [11]

mucuna_legume_plant_picMucuna has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects.[12] This may be of benefit for those of us who are noticing that our brains are not what they used to be and want to make sure our brains stay sharp as we age.

If you’re considering growing mucuna yourself, please note that the legumes must be processed properly. They need to be soaked for two days and have the water changed several times during cooking. If not processed properly and consumed in large quantities, mucuna pruriens can be toxic to humans.

Learn about the healing property of another plant: the aloe vera!

 

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18973898

[2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18955292

[3] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23349947

[4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17385342

[5] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20456630

[6] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22447581

[7] Tan, NH; Fung, SY; Sim, SM; Marinello, E; Guerranti, R; Aguiyi, JC (2009). "The protective effect of Mucuna pruriens seeds against snake venom poisoning".Journal of Ethnopharmacology 123 (2): 356–8.doi:10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.025.PMID 19429384.

[8] "Characterization of the factor responsible for the antisnake activity of Mucuna Pruriens’ seeds" (PDF).Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene 40: 25–28. 1999.

[9]http://sphinxsai.com/sphinxsaiVol_2No.1/PharmTech_Vol_2No.1/PharmTech_Vol_2No.1PDF/PT=132%20(870-874).

[10] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22447581

[11] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23483637

[12] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24716148

Claims on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA. Information on this site is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Sunwarrior’s awesome expert writers do not replace doctors and don’t always cite studies, so do your research, as is wise. Seek the advice of a medical professional before making any changes to your lifestyle or diet.

Sunwarrior likes to share. Please feel free to repost articles as long as you always link back to the original and credit the author.

COMMENTS / REPLIES 0

Want to add your voice?